During my first semester at OU, and during my first-ever German class, I was invited to attend a German poetry night hosted by the OU German Club. I don’t remember exactly why I went, although I suspect that my teacher offered extra credit. It was a lovely experience and it really opened my eye to German in new setting. The only German I had ever heard outside of class was in familiar Christmas carols sung every winter. My teacher encouraged me and everyone else in the class to participate, by reciting a poem or singing a song, but I was much too hesitant about my beginner-level German. Like most people, I get nervous talking in front of groups. My hands start shaking and my heart starts racing and I worry about how I’m standing, where I’m looking, and how I’m pronouncing my words. Everything gets worse when I’m not using my native language. When I attended the German poetry night this year, I decided to face my fears. In pursuit of extra credit, of course.

This semester I have been taking German Literature and Film, a course that dives into the expression of German artists as they process and reflect upon the tumultuous events of the twentieth century. It was difficult at first to process the metaphors and subtle insinuations that were tucked into innocuous, even simplistic events. Sarcasm is a great example. In English, I can follow the train of conversation well enough to recognize when a speaker is utilizing irony to emphasize a point or make a joke. This skill, however, has not yet carried over to German. In order to challenge my limits, I selected a poem by Bertolt Brecht. An esteemed playwright, Brecht is a master of provoking his audience and defying their expectations. When searching for the poem I wanted to recite, I found one stuffed with irony about the pursuit of education. It intrigued me, as did the poem’s effect on the audience. I think that as I move forward towards fluency, poetry will become a useful tool in exploring the subtleties of the language.