In my opinion, Oklahoma is a religious state. Most people belong to some kind of Christian church, are willing to discuss it with anyone, and will invite you to join them on Sunday after knowing you for a short five minutes. I am not trying to criticize, I merely find it quite different compared to my hometown. With their shared roots, it is interesting to compare Christianity, with its many varied sects, and Judaism. This semester, I attended a guest lecture hosted by the Schusterman Center about varied interpretations of the First Commandment.

This fall ,the Schusterman Center brought Dr. Jim Diamond , a distinguished Jewish studies professor from the University of Waterloo, to campus as a guest speaker. His lecture was entitled: “Do We All Serve the Same God? The First ‘Commandment’” Although different religious traditions divide the Ten Commandments differently, the gist of the First Commandment is, “I am the Lord, your God.” As Dr. Diamond discussed, there is some contention over whether this is a commandment or a statement. During his lecture, he discussed the different interpretations of the First Commandment through the years by different religious groups in different countries. As someone who is not particularly familiar with Jewish studies, it was very interesting to hear the perspective of an expert on the matter. As a math major, I prefer dealing with exact sciences, subtleties that can be extrapolated and proved beyond a doubt. I have never taken a philosophy class and I do not have a lot of experience with subjective analysis beyond a few literature courses. Dr. Diamond’s lecture made me think about the distinctions between religious sects resulting from the cultural differences that quietly divide countries, states, and even cities.